i need new windows for my home

It’s getting hot in here!

REPLACEMENT FRENCH DOORS DENVER 

More than Just an Inclusion to Your Home’s Architectural Design

Tired of the heat already?  Your window plays a huge role in the volume of heat that gains entry into your home, or that is lost, at any point in time. This is why it is important that you are aware of the enormous consequences of having poor quality windows installed in your home. Not only do they serve as a major source of unwanted heat gain (in the summer months) or heat loss (in the winter months), they also require you to spend extra (unbudgeted money, sometimes) to have the Air Conditioning system running overtime, to keep your home temperature cool.

As a matter of fact, with our Infinity from Marvin Replacement window, there is technology that makes it possible for you to have super energy-efficient windows with low-E coatings, thus helping to reduce the typical solar heat gain, without compromising the design, view or the amount of daylight that comes in.

 

Here Are Just Some of The Amazing Benefits of Having Energy Efficient Windows:

Improves Energy and Cost Savings

The beauty of having these energy-efficient windows properly selected and installed is that they can significantly help to improve window performance in your home as well as help minimize unnecessary heating, cooling and lighting costs. More so, these windows have special coatings that can save you the additional cost of having to frequently replace your bleached-out fabrics, floors, art and other materials in your home that are directly exposed to the sun’s harmful rays.

Reduces Your Carbon Footprint

Infinity from Marvin fiberglass windows are eco-friendly and are great at helping you to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions. This is so because the power that you save would have been spent creating greenhouse gases. Helping to eliminate this excess power usage, therefore, is a great way to conserve energy, and ultimately reduce your overall carbon footprint.

 

energy efficient windows denver

 

Enhances Your Home’s Thermal Equilibrium

Energy efficient windows characteristically have a great thermal resistance by virtue of the Low E coatings on the glass. The more reason why your home will not get heated up by exposure to direct sunlight. You can always be rest assured that your home’s thermal interior can be maintained at comfortable levels away from the scorching Colorado sun. With summer here, it’s time to stay cool.

 

cardinal low e 366 glass

In the Southwest, air conditioning units need to run nonstop in order to keep houses cool and comfortable. Under such conditions, the right kind of glass can make a big difference. A case study conducted in Roseville, California, proved that Cardinal’s LoĒ² glass maintains comfortable homes while saving energy.

Two identical houses were compared. One was equipped with clear double pane and another using LoĒ² glass. The results concluded that the house equipped with LoĒ² glass showed a 25% reduction in cooling energy and 10% savings in heating energy. Also, the air conditioning unit used ran 1/3 fewer hours compared to the one used in the test house using regular low-e glass.

 

Improved Lighting and View

New fiberglass windows with low-E coatings, serve as the perfect replacement solution to the traditional tinted glazing or shades on your windows to reduce solar radiation. These energy efficient windows are great at protecting your home from unwanted heat without obstructing your views or the amount of daylight that penetrates your home interiors.

Costs for Energy-Efficient Options

Replacement windows with Low E coatings have now become a standard feature of many new home builds and window replacements. On the average, the cost of having these windows installed cannot be said to be expensive, particularly when you consider the enormous costs that are incurred when you don’t. These are, however, some features that will increase the value of your window.

 

summer in denver

 

CAUTION!

You do not want to get caught up in a situation where you have purchased windows according to the U-factor of the glass and have ignored the material of the window frame itself. This is why it is important that you always keep in mind that the U-factor of any energy efficient window could refer to the energy efficiency of the glass alone or the entire window. In many cases, however, the frames are not usually as energy efficient as the glass.  This is why we prefer fiberglass for the window frame.

Need a Reliable Summer Window Replacement?

At Gravina’s, we it’s going to be hot this summer throughout the Denver area. With over 40 years of industry experience in window replacement, we are always glad to recommend the best product for your home and cooling needs.  Infinity from Marvin replacement windows and doors are offered in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, colors and divided lite patterns, all designed to fit your personal style. Visit Gravina’s Window Center of Littleton today, to learn more about all the options available.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY LEARNING

Read about energy audits here

spring colorado weather

Springtime in the Rockies

SPRING IS HERE

One way we know spring is here, besides more sunshine and warm weather, is our phones are ringing constantly.  Plus the weather is unpredictable.  We see our customers ask for windows that will "enhance their home" and "keep them cooler in summer".

spring remodeling checklist denver

For homeowners in Denver, the summers can be hot and dry — temperatures climb to the upper 90's and indoor air conditioners are turned way too often. Everyone in Colorado knows that feeling of your home's south or west side sun beating down on your carpet or furniture.  It is hot and damaging.   Depending on the season, the weather is also prone to storms.

For our customers, energy efficient windows and doors provide comfort year-round while keeping Colorado's sun at bay.  We have LoE Glass packages in our windows and doors to help you there.

We always talk about windows and doors...what about siding?  Siding is a vital building material for your home. It not only defends your house from harsh elements, but it also gives your house character and value. Replacing your siding can be a major upgrade in your home’s appearance, but sometimes it’s not an easy choice to make. Our James Hardie Siding can take the heat here,  plus there are plenty of colors and options to choose from as well.  

Well-chosen windows or siding offer benefits of better living and comfort in addition to the aesthetics.   Why not plan on adding comfort, energy efficiency, beauty, and value to your home.

Abandoned railway tracks in Paris

Métronome

Metronome is an alternative, flexible energy-independent vehicle idea for vacant railway tracks. The greater Paris area is accompanied by a rebirth of new public transport systems: streetcars, Vélib or Autolib to name just a few. New scales of spaces are reappearing like the neighborhood and bring together the hybridization of new, more flexible and local forms of transport to respond to the development of a more environmental society.

marvin tilt wash double hung

Top 10 Innovations In Window Technology

Innovations In Window Technology

These days we take windows for granted, but the past 60 years of evolving window technology are punctuated by developments that, at the time they were presented, completely disrupted the design, composition, thermal properties, and manufacturing methods of windows for both new construction and remodeling. Here are ten innovations that revolutionized windows and, with them, the design of today’s buildings and the lives of the people who live, work, and play in them.

OUR BRAN

Step-by-step Manufacturing of Float Glass

1950s: Float Glass

Alastair Pilkington, technical director of British glass manufacturer Pilkington Brothers, claimed to get the idea for Float Glass while watching a dinner plate floating in the sink. His brain child was a method of floating molten glass over a bath of molten tin, an approach that by the late 1950s was producing flatter and more uniform glass than had ever been possible. This breakthrough was an important step down the path to today’s energy-efficient windows, as the higher-quality glass made possible the application of window films. Float glass is now used in all windows.


1950s: Insulating Glass

Although insulated glass was patented as far back as 1865 actual products only emerged in the 1950s under the name Thermopane. The first versions consisted of two panes welded together at the edges with a ¼ inch dry air space between them—like the double glass liner of a Thermos bottle. By the late ’60s welded insulating glass was in half of all windows. When manufacturers widened the space to a better-insulating ½ inch, however, expansion and contraction put too much stress on the weld, so the industry moved to steel or rubber spacers that joined to the glass with sealants that could absorb the movement. By 2007 about 90 percent of all windows had insulating glazing.


1960s: Vinyl Windows

Although German window manufacturer Trocal introduced the first commercially feasible vinyl windows in the 1950s, the technology first appeared in the U.S. in 1964, when Thermal Industries began offering a vinyl unit to the replacement window market. Vinyl windows didn’t become a player in the new construction market until the late 1980s, but growth since then has been fast. By 2009 they accounted for about 60 percent of all window sales.


Late 1960s: Clad Windows

The late 1960s saw an entirely new window type called clad windows. Andersen introduced its Perma-Shield vinyl clad window in 1966; Pella followed four years later with and aluminum clad product. Marvin was the first to offer a standard aluminum clad finish on its entire product line. Clad windows combine the look of a traditional wood on the inside with a weather-proof exterior that never needs painting. This low-maintenance feature has made them enormously popular: by 2003, about 93 percent of the 25 million wood window units sold in the U.S. market were being made with either an aluminum or vinyl cladding.


1970s: Tilt-In Replacements

The first all-vinyl, double-hung tilt replacement window for the U.S. market was introduced by Pittsburgh, Penn.-based Polytex in the mid-’70s. Newer products, such as Marvin’s Tilt Pac Double Hung Sash Replacement System, are cost-effective options for upgrading an older double-hung window with a frame that’s in good condition, but with a sash or hardware that needs replacement.


1980s: Round Top Windows

Round Top windows had traditionally been hand-crafted by small millwork shops. Around 1980, market demand created the incentive for Marvin to develop manufacturing for round top windows. A Marvin engineer in R&D with experience in boat building applied his knowledge of building curved, wooden frames to develop effective manufacturing processes for the Round Top window. The accessibility of round top windows not only served historic replacement needs, but literally changed the face of modern home design.


1980s: Low-E Glass and Gas-Filled IGUs

A low-E coating is a thin layer of see-through metal that slows heat transfer through the glass. In winter, it redirects some heat back into the room, while in summer it reflects heat from the sun back out. The first commercially available low-E product was Southwall Technologies’ Heat Mirror film, released in 1981 with the help of Lawrence Berkley National Labs and a $700,000 Department of Energy R&D grant. The original product was a suspended film. Although suspended films are still available, manufacturers eventually perfected the technology to deposit the coating on the glass, an approach that’s less costly and more common. By 2005, low-E coatings were on 56 percent of all windows.

While low-E coatings lower radiant heat loss through the window, filling the air space in an insulated glass unit with a low-conductivity gas reduces convective losses. The most common and cost-effective gas fill is argon, which is 34 percent less conductive than air, although some super-high-efficient windows use more expensive and less conductive krypton gas.


1990s: Impact Glass

After Hurricane Andrew blew through South Florida in 1992, officials blamed much of the $25 billion in damage on winds that pressurized homes and blew them apart from the inside. Impact windows were developed as a way to keep wind out of the building. Also, called Hurricane windows, they’re subject to rigorous testing requirements, including the ability to withstand a hit from a 9-pound 2×4 shot out of a cannon at 34 mph, as well as 9,000 cycles of positive and negative pressurization. They achieve this via a combination of laminated glass (as in a car window) and heavy-duty hardware. Building codes are requiring these in hurricane-prone coastal zones, as well as inland areas subject to tornadoes.


Mid-1990s: Fiberglass Frames

Despite the popularity and rot-resistance of vinyl windows, they’re not particularly strong, and can expand and contract with changes in temperatures, placing stress on window seals. The mid-1990s saw the introduction of window frames made from composite materials like Marvin’s Ultrex, a fiberglass material. It’ stronger than vinyl, wood or aluminum, expands and contract less with changes in temperature, and has a vastly superior ability to block heat transfer. For instance, Ultrex frames have three times the strength of wood and eight times that of vinyl.


2000s: Dynamic Glass

The state of the art in window technology is dynamic, or switchable glass. Two versions are currently available. Electrochromic windows control solar gain via a transparent conductor placed between the glass panes that be gradually darkened or lightened using an electric current. The glass blocks heat gain, but remains transparent. The window can be manually tinted or controlled by an automation system. It should not be confused with privacy glass, which uses liquid crystal technology to switch from clear to opaque, and has no energy-saving function.


Current Day:  New Window Technologies on the Horizon

We look forward to see what new window technologies are in the works.  The replacement window industry is always innovating and improving.   As a result of the increase in green building standards and always improving energy efficiency, we try to stay up to speed with all of our products we provide for our customers!

 

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